Many ladles with no bottom are devoted to the Miyameno Shrine, the branch shrine of the Okunitama Shrine

Ladles with no bottom
Shot at Okunitama Shrine, a Shinto shrine in Fuchu, Tokyo ©Tetsu Ozawa
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After passing through the large granite torii gate, I proceeded along the spacious approach to the Okunitama Shrine. Soon, the Ayameno Jinja Shrine appeared on the left side. The shrine is one of the branch shrines of Okunitama Shrine and enshrined Ame-no-uzume no Mikoto. She is a cheerful goddess who danced in front of the Iwato when Amaterasu hid in the Iwato and the world was covered in darkness. For this reason, she is regarded as the goddess of entertainment and is said to be the oldest dancer in Japan.

The story of Iwato-gakure is one of the major myths in Japan, so it is not surprising that there is a shrine dedicated to Ame-no-zume no Mikoto, who plays a leading role in the story. But what I don't understand is that there are many ladles dedicated to the Ayameno Jinja Shrine. Moreover, all of the ladles have no bottom and they are not practical.

I thought that there would be some people who would steal the ladles when the normal ladles were left in the precincts, but it is not so. Ame-no-zume no Mikoto is the god of performing arts as well as the god of safe childbirth, and the bottomless ladle is meant to make the birth of the baby lighter so that the water will flow without getting caught.

日本語
Nov 2021 STILL LIFE TOKYO

Where is Okunitama Shrine?

PHOTO DATA

No

12096

Shooting Date

Jul 2021

Posted On

November 20, 2021

Place

Fuchu, Tokyo

Genre

Street Photography

Camera

SONY ALPHA 7R II

Lens

ZEISS BATIS 2/40 CF

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